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20121201
20121231
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MSNBCW 12
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
, let me quote "the new york times." i have a positive feeling now. this is senator kay bailey hutchison, republican of texas who said a burst of a deal talk broke out as soon as they left the capitol. harry reid was sounding the death knell. what happened yesterday, david? >> congressional leaders came to the white house and had direct talks with the president and john boehner continues to say, look, new it's up to the senate to take action and so there is -- what was noticed on these negotiations and the question is go going, and that's the sticking point and we're waiting to see what happens and we're running out of time and as the other guests have said, it will be up to the house to see if they can get it through. >> i want to throw it up on the screen so folks at home can appreciate when we're talking about and what it will mean for people if no deal is reached. the bush tax cuts expire for all americans. that means everyone's taxes go up. the payroll tax holiday will expire which means roughly $1,000 decrease in take home pay for the the average worker. unemployment insurance goes
that paul has it's an amazing platform in "the new york times" where he could be doing is laying out all sorts of proposals for how to fix the short-term problems of jobs and the economy which he focuses on and the long-term problems of the debt and he takes shot at people like me because i'm a political independent. instead of saying -- let me just finish. instead of pointing fingers and instead of pointing fingers, i really think we need to have republicans and democrats work together and compromise on this. we all agree with that, maya mcginnis. i think it is worth noting that the gop has 115 times, 115 times the republican minority has held up a bill's passage or they've threatened to filibuster. 115 times, that is unprecedented, is it not? >> so you're talking about filibusters. you're talking about the way that washington is actually not able to get anything done anymore and that's a tremendous problem. i'm talking about the fiscal challenges facing the country and the fact that all parts of the budget will have to be addressed. spending and entitlements and revenues and things tha
movement? joining my discussion is jonathan westin, executive director for new york communities for change, and d k director of fast food forward. jonathan, a kind of local strike here in new york, a fast food workers and talk to me about what the strategy was around that. >> so probably a month ago now, hundreds of workers all across new york city went out on strike, and from mcdonald's to burger king to wendy's, to yum brands and kind of a mu multicorporation strike that workers went out on, and based on the fact that workers are continually paid poverty wages that keep them in poverty while they are still working. >> full time. >> people wish they could get the full-time hours, but they get the part-time hours and the $7.25 minimum wage pay and they cannot afford the rent and barely food, and sometimes they c cannot afford the take the train to work, so they walk miles to work, and it is winter and cold out now, and this is what people are going through everyday in the low-wage jobs, and also in walmart and the other industries in the economy that we are becoming. >> so if i'm a labor
50% of the population of new york, the first port of call for the majority of immigrants, was foreign-born. but attitudes were changing. toward the end of the 19th sentry, just 1.6% of immigrants were asian. but apparently that was enough to push congress to pass the chinese exclusion act in 1882 restricting immigration from china for ten years. as public opinion turned against certain kinds of immigrants in the early 20th century, more legislative restrictions began to take hold. in 1924, the johnson-reid immigration act created a quota system. it puts caps on the number of immigrants that could come to the u.s. from a particular country. the act also included a provision that made certain immigrants ineligible for citizenship based on race or nationality. by the middle of the 20th septemberry, the face of immigration to the united states had begun to change. by the end of the 1970s, a third of the foreign-born population of the country hailed from latin america. today that trend has continued. in the last census, more than half of the foreign born population is from latin america. o
about how guns end up on the streets. what was so compelling to me in this new york times article is understanding kids, gangs and guns. we don't seem to understand how so many guns end up on the streets. many borrowed from friends and family, which it turns out is the case in this shooting where it's his mother's guns that end up killing these children. >> that's right. we have a belief that people are going to stores and either buying them at stores and bringing them back or straw purchasers and buying in bulk, getting them to the hands of kids. our gun laws are targeted to those problems. more than 40% of guns come from friends and family into the hands of shooters. it's an extraordinary figure. how do we stop that? public awareness, social services. i read a statistic that said less than 1% of our fill ant pi goes toward criminal justice. that is extraordinarily woeful. you need a comprehensive package which you are targeting gun laws. you have to raise awareness. you have to get to kids young. what are the consequences? >> governor, i want to bring you in on the comprehensive
on newtown. approximately an hour and a half outside of new york city, newtown, connecticut, is a small commuter town locateded in fairfield kocounty. it is a predominantly middle-class white community with approximately 30,000 people. they have several schools and synagogues and churches and it has a rotary club and basketball league like many other towns, but yesterday, as many of you know, newtown became the latest statistic of what is a disturbing pattern of mass gun violence. a gunman opened up fire against schoolchildren and staff at sandy hook elementary and killing at latest count 20 children and 6 adults. the president addressed the nation yesterday in response to the tragedy. >> as a country, we have been through this too many times, whether it is an elementary school in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon or a temple in wisconsin or a movie theater in aurora or a street coroner chicago, these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods, and these children are our children. >> the newtown police continued to update throughout the day and night. >> we will leave no stone unturned as w
in new york city. i interrupt our program to bring you the following news. cyboergs are among us. new recording that is uncovered the extent to which these artificial entities have taken over our country. right before our eyes, they have been taking over all of our nation's institutions, slowly extending their control over our political, legal, and economic systems with their insatiable appetite for profits and prophets alone. these amoral immortals are decimating the rights of us. they are not criminals but they can live forever. even when they take a death blow, a quick cash infusion can keep them going. you may not notice them yet. soon, they will amass every single asset capable of generating hefty returns. these undead are recreating our civic and political culture in service of politics and policies that serves their voracious desire for capital. >> how do these automatoniic corps corps corpses disguise their altered state. they have taken the place of average companies. >> corporations are people. it goes to people. >> taking human form and speaking in plain english, these corp
shouldn't call mr. lapierre crazy. the "new york post" owned by rupert murdoch has the front page today calling him gun nut. >> mr. rupert who is -- >> this is important, not because any of us want to make him subhuman or really hurt him, but this is coming from a conservative place where many conservatives are standing up saying it is nutty. >> a point that we try to make a lot, you have to make a distinction between nra members and the nra leadership. we have frank luntz do a poll of nra members. he's no shrinking daisy or crazy lefty like some of you. >> some. i think it's a great point. i just want to show one quick thing before we go to another break. there was an amazing home page, the huffington post had, because we have been talking about the mass shiiootings, but talking about the individual deaths. this is since newtown. take a look at that. this is how many people have died in gun crimes since then. >> how many people have died, how many people are going to continue to die, how many people could be maimed and put in wheelchairs. when are we going to stop this mess. i want to
of radio. the founder of the new york arab american comedy festival. elan james white is a blogger and friend of nerdland and molly, a writer and co-host of radio dispatch. nice to have you all here. >> thank you. >> thank you for having us. >> we did have a good time as a team going through everything that happened during 2011. jaime, what was your favorite moment of 2012? >> you after commercial saying that was clint eastwood talking to a chair. my second -- first of all, so i don't forget, i have to sort of stick up for ron paul quickly. i'm not one of those guys, but i did like that ron paul was the only candidate that wanted to end the wars and he talked about the war on drugs. he was so crazy on other things. >> he wanted to end the war except the war on people without insurance in the hospital. >> or people who don't have -- so, because of all that stuff, i kind of have this fantasy where ron paul and obama would do an '80s movie body switch where they learn a lesson. obama is like we should end the war on drugs and ron paul is like i don't hate women. my favorite moment was
to give up the fight that they've already lost three times? hmm. with me at the table, new york university constitutional law professor, kenji yoshino. donna edwards of marylandment senior fellow, bob herbert and jayening off, the former director of consumer insurance oversight at the u.s. department of health and human services. nice to have you all here. >> a long intro for what your job was. your role was to begin the i am plemtation of aca. in certain ways you got the plum part of the job where you get to cover your young people longer and the end of these insurance mandates in certain ways. but this is the hard part. what should we be looking for? >> exchanges, if they're implemented correctly, can for the first time give individuals who have had no bargaining power against insurance companies, the same bargaining power that they would have if they worked for a large business. through these exchanges, 16 million people who haven't been in the market before are going to buy insurance, they're required to buy insurance. a majority of them will be subsidized by the federal government. so
this incentive in a certain way. >> in terms of accessing care, we mentioned during the break, in new york state, we have medicaid is the best insurance money can't buy. with medicaid benefits, people get access to all their medications, doctors advice its advicevisits. arrive to and from the clinic with visiting nurses care. sometimes they are afraid to get a job because they might lose that benefit. that's terrible to think that someone would get out of their care and lose their benefits if they were really working. that's a big problem. >> we will go to break and come back on this. this was sort of one of those ah-ha moments for me. not all states are as generous with medicaid. if you have an hiv positive diagnosis before it passes, you cannot access new health care, because you had a pre-existing condition. it was actually better to have to live below the poverty line to be able to access medicaid, because in order to pay out of pocket for these, you would have to be making $250,000. every other normal job' world in the middle actually meant that you didn't have access to care. >> just to ad
. is it about the personalities at the table? allen is a professor after administration at new york university's graduate school of public service where he teaches negotiation, conflict resolution and public involvement. thank you for being here. >> my pleasure. give us your assessment of the negotiations between john boehner, the republicans and president obama. >> it's hard to know what's happening at the table. my speculation is, at some point, the president said to the speaker, so i have made some compromises already. i put things on the table. what do you have to put on the table? that may have been what triggered boehner having to go back to the house to get something passed because he couldn't speak for his members. >> he doesn't speak for his members. given that, did it make sense for the president to put something on the table that seemed to be a departure. he said $250,000 and up. he comes to boehner with no hand. no numbers that match in his hand. did it make sense for the president to go to $400,000? >> the senate saying $500,000. >> i was concerned about that. richard spoke he was
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)